Share your money saving tips

Moderators: TalbotWoods, JaneClack

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By szarban
#161077 I have done some research on uswitch and it seems I could save £200 a year on water if I get a metre installed.

does anyone know if I need to inform my landlord oif my intention?

ta
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By Yogi Bear
#161080
szarban wrote:I have done some research on uswitch and it seems I could save £200 a year on water if I get a metre installed.

does anyone know if I need to inform my landlord oif my intention?

It would be advisable, yes. You might in fact need his consent:
http://www.ofwat.gov.uk/aptrix/ofwat/pu ... infonote46
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By Bright Future
#161197 Once you've changed to a water meter, neither you or any future occupant or owner can reverse this decision.
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By szarban
#161202 according to uswitch the decision can be reversed within 12 months...
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By Yogi Bear
#161206
szarban wrote:according to uswitch the decision can be reversed within 12 months...

That's right. :) Customers can revert to an unmeasured charge within 12 months of a meter installation:
http://www.ofwat.gov.uk/aptrix/ofwat/pu ... infonote46
By red24
#161208 Does anyone else have experiences of water meters and how they work out.
We have just received our 1st bill with a meter in a new property and it already looks like its working out more than we paid before unmetered.
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By Bright Future
#161368 I stand corrected re my comment on not being able to change back from a water meter.

Nonetheless, it may be worth asking whether water is metered or not when viewing a property. All homes built since 1989 will be fitted with a water meter - no rateable values exist for properties after this date as the poll tax replaced the rates.

The advice on this water company's website is probably standard advice regarding water meters etc
http://www.stwater.co.uk/server.php?show=nav.001001002

My water company sent me a water saving device - like a hippo but smaller - which I placed in my cistern.
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By Gazza1912
#164406 As a single person, I certainly benefit from having a water meter installed, but if there is more than one person living in the same property, I undertand there is very little saving to be made, in fact you could end up paying more.
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By Bright Future
#164464 People with gardens will probably not be better off with a water meter especially if they use hosepipes and sprinklers a lot during summer.
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By froglet
#173582 I have a water meter, and use a hippo in my cistern, and I pay around £20 a month with Anglia water. People I work with pay a whole lot more and they don't have meters. I'm very conscious of conservation though, and rarely use our jet washer, use the washing machine once a week at low settings, use water cans for plants and shower rather than use the bath. Now my gas bill....Oh Lordy, I won't even "go there" :!: :!:
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By geordie
#176314 anyone with a qualifying medical condition ie i have crones disease are entitled to a fixed rate on there water meter and sewerage usage check with your local water authority i believe there are also concessions for large families who are in receipt of certain benefits geordie
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By marknlinz
#176333 If you get certain benefits, you can apply to the water co. for your bill to be capped.
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By moaner
#189041 We are on a water meter here for the first time :(

We used to pay £13 per month rates and use however much water we wanted, now its on a meter its over £70 per month :shock:
We are a family of 5. We try to use the least water possible but its tough. Both myself and my daughter suffer from IBS (too much information :lol: )
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By geordie
#189054 inform your local water company of your situation and you should be able to get a capped water bill because of the IBS and size of your family . geordie
By Butts
#189146 Water rates are crazy due to the fact they are based on rateable values that are 20 years out of date.

The reason there has not been a fuss is because older propertys generally have a lower rateable value than newer ones which generally tend to be inhabited by wealthier people.

When I first moved up to the Midlands (20 years ago) I had a brand new 1 Bedroom Bungalow with a much higher rateable value than the 3 Bedroom Semi ( inter -war ) that I live in now.

Thus you have the situation where a bigger but older property attracts a much lower water bill than a small new one. Obviously more people can live in a 3 bedroom house and use far more water at a lower charge.

I am waiting with trepidation for when the rateable values are reassesed as I know I will get hammered !!!

The only logical way to pay for a utility is by how much you consume . Imagine if gas and electricity bills were charged the same way.

I am not paying my fair share and I think everyone should have a meter - however it is not politically expedient for that to happen at the moment. :mrgreen: