Discussions on life after your bankruptcy discharge.

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By fixingtheholes
#141687 Hi all

I am a discharged BR (September 06). I have a Co-op basic account with an Electron card which covers most of my needs but a cheque book would be very useful. Co-op have said I am not eligible with them.

So my question is, which banks offer an account with a cheque book to discharged bankrupts?

My salary is less than £1500 a month so if I have got this correct then Citibank will not offer a chequebook, is that right? I am in regular full-time work with a monthly net salary just over £1400.

I am particularly interested in Nationwide for other reasons but cannot find info relating to BRs on their website.

Many thanks
FTH...
By circleoflight
#141717 You don't really need a chequebook for anything!

You would do better with a prepaid Mastercard like Cashplus or similar.

I have not used a cheque book for over a year and haven't missed it in the slightest.
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By isio
#141721 circleoflight, your answer is so patronising. Maybe there is a good reason why FTH needs a cheque book.
By jonnie000
#141726 I've had one occassion where a cheque was necessary to avoid driving all the way to the University to pay a fee. I had to use a Credit Card Cheque, which had a charge of £1.50 for the privilege, which was nice... not. But was cheaper than driving there and back. So cheques are still handy on occassions, though I have to admit I've never been much for using cheques. THe only time I ever got caught out with a lack of funds in my old pre-bankruptcy bank account was when i'd paid my rent by cheque and the landlord didn't cash it for many weeks, then when he did the funds weren't there... oops!
By Stephen
#141760 If you get a "normal" Flex account from Nationwide you will get a cheque book. This account "can" be given to Bankrupts (I was given my account whilst I was bankrupt with a VISA Debit card and a Cheque book)

BUT - as I'm sure you'll have seen from lots of other post - it is such a lottery regarding which account you can and can't get, that you may be lucky - or you may not!!

But even with a 'basic' Nationwide account, you get counter cheques for free - which goes some of the way to what you might need. Iknow it's not the same as having your own cheque book, but can still be useful.
By fixingtheholes
#141769 Stephen: many thanks for the info. I'll enquire at the local branch and keep fingers crossed. I'm actually hoping to get a joint account with my partner who is not BR - we separated our accounts before my BR but before that we had a joint account or years and it is what we prefer.

With a chequebook for those four or five times a year when a card will not do :-)

circle of light: good for you but your needs are obviously different than mine. For example I need to send some money to a friend - obviously a bit of plastic won't do. Of course there are ways round it - it'll be a postal order most likely - but a cheque would be simpler another time.

Best
Fixing the holes....
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By Dicharged01/07
#141856
fixingtheholes wrote:Stephen: many thanks for the info. I'll enquire at the local branch and keep fingers crossed. I'm actually hoping to get a joint account with my partner who is not BR - we separated our accounts before my BR but before that we had a joint account or years and it is what we prefer.

With a chequebook for those four or five times a year when a card will not do :-)

circle of light: good for you but your needs are obviously different than mine. For example I need to send some money to a friend - obviously a bit of plastic won't do. Of course there are ways round it - it'll be a postal order most likely - but a cheque would be simpler another time.

Best
Fixing the holes....


To be honest though, there are ways around it, and I have found I need cheques totalling 3 at the beginning of every month, one being my therapist...At the beginnig of the month, I go into my Nationwide Branch and get them all at once over the counter...It works for me.

Althernatively, if its a friend you want to pay, you can either go into their branch and pay the cash with their Account details or do it online...cheqy=ue not necessairy..
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By isio
#141866 because of my doctoral studies, my bank agreed to give me a student account with overdraft facilities and a chequebook with guarantee card after my discharge. Cheques made my life a lot easier. Some of the conferences I had to attend over the last 3 years accept cheque only as payment. I no longer find myself in embarrassing situations like asking a friend to send a cheque on my behalf and explain this to my supervisors when claiming the money back from the university, etc. I had to pay people who agreed to take part in my projects or experiments some money towards their expenses. Those payments had to be done by cheque also. Some small companies and local government departments accepted cheques or postal orders only as payment type for some of the services they supplied.
By fixingtheholes
#141883 Well yes, I've managed for over a year now since BR without a cheque book, mainly by getting my partner to write them out of her account when necessary, but it can be a bit of a hassle because hers is a business account so it slightly complicates her tax records.

But all the same it is not a major problem and will not be a big issue if I cannot get one now. Useful to know that Nationwide will issue cheques over the counter if required, another good rason to try for an account with them.

Thanks and best wishes to all
Fixing the Holes...